The Loop Closes: Time Travelling in Style in Rian Johnson’s Looper

'Killing is my business - and business is good': Joe Simmons (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in his element.

Time travels are nothing too unusual in cinema. We’ve seen it in several Star Trek movies and in the Back To The Future trilogy, amongst many others. Meeting one’s own younger or older self always poses a lot of difficulties for the heroes of these movies, as even the slightest change in the past may alter the whole time-space continuum.

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Driss (Omar Sy, left) and Philippe (François Cluzet, right) race down the streets of Paris.

Dear Friends: The French Surprise Hit Intouchables, or a Unique and Charming Plea for Respect and Tolerance

Driss (Omar Sy, left) and Philippe (François Cluzet, right) race down the streets of Paris.

A big fuss has been made about Michel Hazanavicius’s French silent film The Artist winning Best Picture at the 2012 Academy Awards. Yes, it’s an aberration, since a non-Anglo-American movie winning the prestigious trophy usually only happens once in a blue moon. Roberto Benigni’s Italian Life Is Beautiful tried but failed against James Cameron’s Titanic in 1997. So the success of The Artist came as somewhat of a surprise, although it’s debatable if it was even the best French film of its class because of a little picture by the unknown duo of directors Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano.

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When Two Worlds Collide: ‘The Ugly Truth’ about Andrew Stanton’s John Carter

Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins, left) and John Carter (Taylor Kitsch, right) in the Mars desert.

Expectations were enormous when Disney’s long-announced new live-action 3D blockbuster John Carter hit theaters in March. At an estimated budget of a ‘mere’ $250 million, John Carter is the fourth-most expensive film of all time. The studio was certainly willing to take that risk, given its good experiences with such big-budget blockbusters as the Pirates Of The Caribbean sequels and the animated Tangled. John Carter was supposed to be Disney’s answer to James Cameron’s 3D spectacle Avatar, a science-fiction adventure set in an alien world that would make use of the technology’s manifold possibilities.

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The Analytical Mind: Comparing Sherlock Holmes, Then and Now

Sherlock Holmes (Robert Downey jr., left) and Doctor Watson (Jude Law, right) on the hunt for criminals.

Arthur Conan Doyle’s great detective, Sherlock Holmes, is one of English literature’s most recognizable and enduring characters. As such, he has made more than 200 movies appearances since the inception of cinema. The master snoop had been portrayed by such luminaries as Basil Rathbone, Jeremy Brett, Christopher Plummer, Patrick Macnee, Jonathan Pryce, Christopher Lee and Charlton Heston. When Madonna’s former husband, British director Guy Ritchie, announced his plans to create a new version of Sherlock Holmes for the big screen, his choice for the part seemed rather curious to a lot of people. The filmmaker went with American actor Robert Downey jr. in the eponym’s role. The oft-troubled performer from ‘the other side of the pond,’ although talented, was a much-criticized selection due to the fact that he was battling drug addiction and legal problems for the better part of the 1990s and, more importantly, because he is no Englishman. Would he be capable of a convincing performance worthy of the legendary mantle?

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